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The new Subway Public Dashboard is a user-friendly tool that tells our customers how we’re doing by:

  • 1. Displaying new measures that reflect the performance of our subway system in a way that’s more relevant to customers.
  • 2. Providing our customers with valuable information – about the entire system, or just about the line, or lines, that they take.
  • 3. Offering an easy-to-use tool that improves transparency.

The dashboard measures reflect weekday service.

Major Incidents by Cause
An incident that delays 50 or more trains. Such events cause the most disruption to customers. Major incidents are separated into six categories:

  • Track Track fires, broken rails, switch trouble, and other track conditions.
  • Signals Signal and track circuit failures, and other equipment and transmission problems related to signals, both for conventional color-light signals and for new technology Communications-Based Train Control (CBTC) signals.
  • Persons on Trackbed/Police/Medical Police and/or medical activity due to sick customers, vandalism, assault, persons struck by trains, unauthorized persons on tracks, and suspicious packages.
  • Stations & Structures Obstructions and other structural problems, such as damage to tunnels or debris on the right-of-way; electrical problems, such as defective wires, cables, and power systems that aren’t on trains, including traction power to run the trains.
  • Subway Car Broken doors, seats, windows, lights, brakes, and other problems caused by defective trains, such as power or air conditioning failures.
  • Other Inclement weather, water conditions, external power supply failures, as well as drawbridge openings and other external conditions, such as unstable nearby buildings, nearby fires, civil demonstrations, and/or parades.

Service Delivered
Measures NYCT’s ability to deliver the service that’s scheduled. Service Delivered is measured along the busiest part of the line, which reflects service across the entire line, and is reported as the percentage of scheduled trains that are actually provided during peak hours – 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m.

Additional Platform Time (APT)
The average added time that customers spend waiting on the platform for a train, compared with their scheduled wait time. Platform time (sometimes referred to as Excess Wait Time) is a new indicator for the MTA, but is considered an industry best practice worldwide. APT is measured using a combination of customers’ MetroCard entry data into stations combined with train departure times from those stations. The measure uses information from the real-time train tracking technologies that provide train arrival information. Peak hours are from 7am to 10am in the morning and 4pm to 7pm in the evening.

Additional Train Time (ATT)
The average additional unanticipated time customers spend onboard the train due to various service issues. Train time (sometimes referred to as Excess Travel Time) is a new indicator for the MTA, but is considered an industry best practice worldwide. ATT is measured using a combination of customers’ MetroCard entry data into their starting stations and customers’ arrival times at their destination stations, using information from the real-time train tracking technologies that provide train arrival information. Peak hours are from 7am to 10am in the morning and 4pm to 7pm in the evening.

Station Passenger Environment Survey Key Performance Indicator (PES-KPI)
These indicators combine the results of surveys of a number of different aspects of station condition in three categories:

  • Physical appearance: Is the station clean and free of graffiti?
  • Equipment: Are MetroCard vending machines, turnstiles and station attendant booths in working order?
  • Information: What service information is available to our customers to help ease their commute? Are there maps easily visible and in good condition? Are Transit employees available, in proper uniform and able to provide customer assistance? Is the signage clear and up‐to‐date?

Due to statistical variations in the monthly surveys this number is reported as a 12-month average, available by borough.

Elevator and Escalator Availability
The percent of time that elevators or escalators are operational system wide. Most elevators and escalators in the subway are maintained by New York City Transit and are electronically monitored 24-hours a day. Some elevators and escalators in the subway are owned and maintained by outside parties; these are inspected by NYCT personnel every 8 hours.

Mean Distance Between Failure (MDBF)
This measure reports how frequently car-related problems such as door failures, loss of motor power or brake issues, cause a delay of over five minutes. It is calculated by dividing the number of miles train cars run in service by the number of incidents due to car‐related problems. Due to statistical variations in the monthly figures this number is reported as a 12-month average.

Subway Car Passenger Environment Survey Key Performance Indicator (PES-KPI)
These indicators combine the results of surveys of a number of different aspects of subway car condition in three categories:

  • Appearance: Do the trains appear clean? Are they free of graffiti?
  • Equipment: Does the equipment work – the door panels, lighting, heat and air-conditioning?
  • Information: Is the Information helpful and appropriate? Are there maps, proper signage? Are the conductor’s announcements clear?

Due to statistical variations in the monthly surveys this number is reported as a 12-month average.

Wait Assessment (WA)
Measures how regularly the trains are spaced. To meet the standard, the headway (time between trains) can be no greater than 25% more than the scheduled headway. This provides a percentage of trains passing the standard, but does not account for extra service operated, is not weighted to how many customers are waiting for the trains at different stations, does not distinguish between relatively minor gaps in service and major delays, and is not a true measurement of time customers spend waiting on the platform. Peak hours are from 7am to 10am in the morning and 4pm to 7pm in the evening.

Terminal On-Time Performance (TOTP)
Measures how well trains keep to their schedule arrivals at their destination terminals. It is a legacy metric that is calculated as the percent of trains that arrive within 5 minutes of their scheduled arrival times. This provides a measure of trains arriving within the standard, and not a direct measure of customer travel time, particularly since relatively few customers travel all the way to the end of a line.